The practice of communicating through pictures is something I already do–often.

I live 1200 miles from my parents, see, and they love sending me
pictures taken on their cell phones, and I send them photos as well.
We show each other what we are up to, or use pictures as a way to tell
a story of something that happened that is unusual. So, for my final
project, I have been communicating with my mom in what I call a “photo
conversation”. She sends me a photo, and I respond with a photo, and,
as with a real conversation, one who does not know the participants
may not be able to make the same connections between the pictures
(that is, the conversational thread).

What is important to me is the continuance of a visual conversation
over time–so far about 7 weeks–and that the compilation of that
conversation that can be viewed all at once.

To do this, I will be creating a small, simple accordion style book,
one that can be pulled apart and viewed as one continuous series of
pictures. There will be a single image per page. By the time I print
the images, in two weeks, I expect to have at least 80 images,
probably more.

The conversation will not be censored—so, if one repeats herself (my
mom sent the same picture twice), it will be so in the book form. This
is important because I want the characteristics of a real conversation
to remain intact; and sometimes one repeats herself, or starts a new
subject that seems random to an outsider, or picks up where she left
off at an earlier time. What is important is that I document the
conversation as it happened, and kind of like a journal–it gets kind
of messy, but I’m okay with that.

Making Some Progress.

November 6, 2011

Here is a quick update in regards to my final project:

The Exquisite Corpse project struck me in a number of ways, one being that the practice of communicating through pictures is something I already do. I live 1200 miles from my parents, see, and they love sending me pictures taken on their cell phones, and I send them photos as well. We show each other what we are up to, or use pictures as a way to tell a story of something that happened that is unusual. So, for my final project, I have been communicating with my mom in what I call a “photo conversation”. She sends me a photo, and I respond with a photo, and, as with a real conversation, one who does not know the participants may not be able to make the same connections between the pictures (that is, the conversational thread). What is important to me is the continuance of a visual conversation over time, so far about three weeks, and the compilation of that conversation that can be viewed all at once.

To do this, I will be creating a simple accordion style book, one that can be pulled apart and viewed as one continuous series of pictures. There will be 2 or 3 images per page, and I estimate at least 40 images, probably more. The conversation will not be censored—so, if one repeats herself (my mom sent the same picture twice), it will be so in the book form. This is important because I want the characteristics of a real conversation to remain intact; and sometimes one repeats herself, or starts a new subject that seems random to an outsider, or picks up where she left off at an earlier time.

This project may be expanded if I can rope in more volunteers—who will probably be close friends and family who I already interact with through cell phone pictures. Of course, in the case that they help me with this project, the number of pictures will be purposely amplified and created specifically for the purpose of conversation. If others participate, I will make each conversation into its own little book, since each will have a different number of pictures, and each is a separate interaction with a special person—also, the character of each person will show through the pictures that they share with me.

Normally, I would show some images from my photo conversation as a little sneak peak, however it seems more important to show the conversation in its entirety when it is completed. ….Sorry! But here is an example of what an accordion book looks like (though mine may be significantly less fancy looking):

838.

September 12, 2011

For one week, I took a picture at 8am, 3pm, and 8pm. Even in the short period of seven days, patterns in my whereabouts at certain times emerge.

 

 

24 Hours.

August 29, 2011

Last Friday, I photographed every still image within sight for an entire day–apart from images encountered while driving and in a grocery store (1. Too dangerous  2. Against store policy). I noticed that even after I was finished with this exercise, even today, I notice all of the little pictures that crowd my desk and counter, and those that I see nearly every day but hardly noticed before. Now, they all catch my attention.

KMcNutt_24HR